Kimberly Jamison

Kimberly Jamison
Assistant Professor, Educational Leadership and Administration

Dr. Kim Jamison is an Assistant Professor of Educational Leadership and Administration in the Graduate School of Education and Human Development. The central theme to her scholarship centers on preparing and supporting aspiring and current educational leaders at the university and school district levels. Her research interests include bridging the theory to practice gap in educational leadership through internships and other clinical experiences, administrative intern and mentor partnership dynamics, doctoral cohort program structures and supports and preparing administrators to lead schools through the lens of equity and social justice.

As a practitioner, Dr. Jamison has served as a teacher and administrator at the elementary, secondary, and central office levels in Maryland, North Carolina, and Virginia. As an Instructional Coach and Interventionist in various schools, she focused on guiding administrators and their staffs in the areas of student achievement, building teacher capacity, and whole-school improvement efforts through on-going professional development. At the central office level, she supported schools and district-wide efforts on the alignment of curriculum, instruction, and assessment. As a teacher and building-level school leader, she followed her passion for impacting Title I schools by seeking teaching and administrative positions in multiple underserved communities throughout her career. In that capacity, Dr. Jamison brings the unique experience of leading a Title I elementary school through the challenges of the unprecedented COVID-19 pandemic.

Her work is published in several national and international publications. Dr. Jamison was the recipient of the national Robert Kottkamp Outstanding Dissertation of the Year Award in 2015, presented by the American Educational Research Association (AERA), for her dissertation on the experiences of administrative interns during the internship process using a developmental concerns framework.

Prior to joining university faculty, Dr. Jamison served as a Senior Research Associate and Adjunct Faculty member in GSEHD's Educational Leadership and Administration program and taught Qualitative Research Methods at the doctoral level as well.

Dr. Jamison holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Education from Towson University, a Master of Arts degree in Educational Leadership and Administration from The George Washington University, a Postgraduate Certificate in Gifted Education from the University of North Carolina Charlotte, and a Doctorate in Educational Leadership and Policy Studies from The George Washington University.

Education
Ed.D., The George Washington University
Post-Graduate Certificate, University of North Carolina Charlotte
M.A., Educational Leadership and Administration, The George Washington University
B.S., Towson University
Publications

Jamison, K., Clayton, J. K., & Thessin, R. A. (2020). Utilizing the educational leadership mentoring framework to analyze intern and mentor dynamics during the administrative internship. Mentoring & Tutoring: Partnership in Learning. doi: 10.1080/13611267.2020.1859328

Jamison, K., Clayton, J., & Tekleselassie, A. (2018). The nexus between theory and practice: How the transformative initiative pathway improved clinical practice for educational leadership preparation. International Journal of Educational Leadership Preparation, 13(1). ISSN: 2155-9635

Thessin, R., Clayton, J., & Jamison, K. (2018). Profiles of the administrative internship: The mentor/intern partnership in facilitating leadership experiences. Journal of Research in Leadership Education. doi: 10.1177/1942775118770778

Clayton, J. K., Jamison, K. R., Tekleselassie, A., & Briggs, A. N. (2017). Linking research to clinical practice: Insights from the transformational pathways in an administration preparation program. Educational Planning, 24(3), 45-56.

Jamison, K. R., & Clayton, J. K. (2016). Exploring the experiences of administrative interns: Implications for university preparation programs. The Journal of Education Administration, 54(5), 514-546.